Mercy’s Cartel – „Feel My Vibe“

New single Feel my Vibe creatively discusses substance abuse, youth culture and how to deal with ill mental health. “Feel My Vibe was written shortly I went into hospital after experiencing the hate crime. I was abusing substances heavily and severely depressed. I started to see myself in icons like Amy Winehouse and Whitney Houston – I think their lives were beautifully tragic but I didn’t want to end up that way. Bristol’s student youth culture is very problematic. So Feel My Vibe is me trying to stop myself going down a darker route.” – Mercy

Essex-born Mercy Sotire created Mercy’s Cartel after being inspired to drop out of University at a Chance The Rapper concert, “I admired Chance’s journey and how he became successful without major label backing. I’m inspired by a new wave of artists that are taking control of their artistic destiny. That night, I started to believe I could do the same thing.”

Growing up listening to Nigerian music heavily impacts Mercy’s creations with fusions of afrobeat continually being featured throughout her songs. Mercy’s alternative R&B production is also influenced by Trap, Hip-Hop, Neo-soul.

2017 was one of the most pivotal years for Mercy’s Cartel thus far. Mercy made a strong impact in the U.K. student community by speaking on social issues with BBC, Sky News and The DailyMail. “I was involved in a viral story about racism/hate crimes in Russell Group Unis and Essex. I was propelled into the media and I felt uncomfortable with the narrative they gave me. Music gave me a way to speak about important social issues from my own point of view and control my own narrative. I feel as though it’s my duty as a young black woman to speak up about my experiences. Music is my form of social activism.”

Mercy’s Cartel is already impacting the industry featuring on BBC Introducing with her demo ‚Nick of Time‘, starting her own student music agency, and being voted 3rd in Bristol in The Barclays & The Tabs Future 100 Women to Watch in 2017.